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What’s it like to go on a cruise now? Here’s how COVID-19 has changed the onboard experience
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What’s it like to go on a cruise now? Here’s how COVID-19 has changed the onboard experience

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Carnival Cruise Line's new ship Mardi Gras made its debut last summer at Port Canaveral. Carnival, the world's largest cruise company, reported that bookings for the second half of 2022 already surpassed bookings for 2019. (Carnival Cruise Line/TNS)

LOS ANGELES — The cruise industry suffered its biggest financial blow in decades when the COVID-19 pandemic halted most sailings for months and made nervous cruise fans think twice about booking an ocean voyage.

But cruising is back and all signs point to a turn of the tide for the industry: More cruises are scheduled to depart the Port of Los Angeles next year than in 2019.

Carnival Corp., the world’s largest cruise company, reported that bookings for the second half of 2022 already surpassed bookings for 2019. Royal Caribbean cruises for 2022 are nearly at 2019 levels, the company’s chief financial officer, Jason Liberty, said on a recent earnings calls.

Despite the shutdown, the world’s cruise lines have more than 100 new ships on order to set sail by 2027. The Majestic Princess, a ship designed to serve the Chinese market, made its maiden call from the Port of L.A. on Oct. 6. Some 200 cruises are scheduled to depart from there in 2022, up from 120 in 2019.

What are cruise lines requiring of passengers? How have boarding, dining and other activities on board changed? We gathered some information to answer common questions.

 

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